The one with (not so) many words

I hate labels. I hate people insisting on labels because it somehow makes life easier for them if you are pigeon-holed. But lately I have learnt that labels can sometimes be a good thing. Like when it comes to labelling my child as having Special Educational Needs. This label means that she is able to get the extra help and attention that she needs. This label means that the school are giving me their full support in helping my child. This can only be a good thing. Although I must admit that it was hard to swallow when I first read that letter from school. It was of course the help and recognition that we needed but seeing it down in black and white made me stop and take a gulp.

My youngest daughter was a late talker but I never felt that this was such a big deal. At the time I mostly put it down to the fact that she had older siblings to do all of her talking for her. Because they did. She took to her role as the baby of the family like a duck to water and has been doted on since the day she was born. As she turned two, she could barely say a word but I always thought it would just click one day. Well we all did, health professionals too. And indeed as she got older, her vocabulary did grow and often in great spurts. (In fact, I came across this old post the other day which really made me chuckle. Oh and she still calls her Daddy ‘Father’ to this day by the way!) But as she approached her fourth birthday, it became clear that she had some problems with her speech. She was missing the ends off words and having trouble pronouncing certain letters. Her nursery (who were bloody marvellous) asked us to consider referring her to a speech therapist. At the time I didn’t want to believe that she had a problem. I wanted to believe that she would just get there in time. But the truth was that she did need that extra help and of course I was never going to stand in the way of that.

My daughter has been seeing a speech therapist for almost a year now. Anybody who has any experience with speech issues will know just what a long and often repetitive process it is. With my daughter it has been essential to go right back to basics and she is being taught how to make the simplest of sounds before we can move on to perfecting whole words. There are all sorts of ‘games’ that we play at home every day with her, she has monthly speech therapy sessions and she now has one on one time at school thanks to her amazing SEN assistant. The thing with speech therapy is that it can’t be rushed. That means that at times, it can terribly tedious and frustrating. Although it has to be said, more for me than my daughter. I just desperately want to help her but this isn’t something that can be pushed.

Through all of this, my daughter has just been amazing. We have always used sign language from being a teeny tiny baby (we have with all of our children in fact) and I think this has been a huge part of her never feeling frustrated by her struggles. And she does really really struggle. But if anything, struggling has made her even more clever. She has the patience of a saint and if we don’t understand a certain word that she says, she will always find a way to make us understand her. Whether that is through sign language, an impromptu game of charades or saying every other word that she can think of that is associated to that one word we don’t understand, she never ever gives up. I don’t think I have ever known such amazing determination.

This week sees my daughter start weekly sessions with her speech therapist. We’ve been on the waiting list forever and I can’t wait for her to start. I really hope that this will be the extra (gentle) push that she needs. There’s no question that she will get there. I have one very determined little girl. And I honestly couldn’t be prouder.

About Sarah Maginnis

Blissfully happy (mostly) yummy mummy to four children and (occasional) domestic goddess. Aspiring author and blogger extraordinaire.
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8 Responses to The one with (not so) many words

  1. I hope the weekly sessions help, sounds like you have a very determined little girl :)

  2. Weekly speech therapy will make a huge improvement. I saw that with my oldest son who went through it at the age of 4. He’s 7 now and almost as clear as his peers (I’d say 98% out of a 100 :).

  3. This was very timely for me as my 4yo’s teacher has asked me to consider speech therapy. I don’t want to start yet as at school she is working in her second language. Her English, that we use at home, is much stronger but I admit it’s not her strongest skill. I’m keeping an open mind and waiting until the new year to see how things develop.

  4. Emily says:

    You’re amazing. The way you are handling this with such grace and positivity. You are absolutely doing the best for her and although it’ll take time, I’m sure it’ll be worth it and will pay off in the end. The way you are working with her teachers and SEN is just brilliant and I’m sure all of this is why she handles it all so well.

  5. powerplay2012 says:

    sending you luck :-) im excited for you and your daughter. Speech development does take a whole lot of patience and determination. Keep it up!

  6. Honest Mum says:

    Wishing her all the best, what a remarkable, amazing girl and Mama x

  7. I hope the sessions helps and what a fab mum you are and wonderful daughter you have x

  8. I’ve just been catching up with your blog posts from the last few weeks and I thoroughly enjoyed it all (although I skimmed past the reviews – that’s ok, right?). I’ve been nodding along with everything and I love your outfits! I must come back more often. :)

    I’m really interested to hear about your experiences of speech therapy. Our older son’s nursery asked us if we’d like to refer him around this time last year as he has issues with pronunciation (although he has a good vocabulary). We’re still waiting for the first appointment but chased them up recently and found out it should be within the next month. So we have all this to come.
    My younger son is nearly 2 1/2 and he hardly talks at all. We took him to the GP soon after he turned 2 and she advised us to wait a few months but he hasn’t improved much so he has now been referred too. Like your daughter he’s very expressive and manages to communicate what he wants pretty well without words – most of the time. But we’ve never done signing and I’m wondering if we should start as he does have the occasional terrible tantrum when he can’t make himself understood.
    Your daughter sounds so lovely and it’s great to hear about speech therapy with positive outcomes. I hope it keeps going well for you and I’ll come back more frequently to find out. :)
    xx

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